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Better Together

Dave and I love to relax and reflect at the end of the day by enjoying the warmth of a campfire in our backyard. On one such evening, he had the fire burning brightly when one of the logs suddenly fell away from the main firewood. Even though it had been burning very well, it was only a matter of a few minutes when the fire from the fallen log went out and the embers started losing their glow. He got up and put the log back with the others and it started blazing once again. Our peaceful evening was interrupted with a thunder roll as the sky darkened, the wind began blowing and rain started coming down. As we ran for cover, I thought the fire would die out, but to my surprise it kept on burning. Because we live in the city, by-laws require a fire not to be left unattended.  We had to get an umbrella, stand out in the rain, and separate the logs for the fire to be extinguished.

What a good object lesson for the body of Christ. During this time of gathering restrictions and social distancing, I believe we have learned some life-long lessons regarding the support, encouragement, and value of relationships. While some may still behave as though they are an island unto themselves, the simple truth is that we need one another. All our shortcomings and failures combined with the complexities of life only reinforce the truth that we need one other as we journey toward eternal life with Christ.

At Christian Grandparenting Network Canada (CGNC), we realize the need for community can be pronounced for the grandparent who has determined to intentionally impact their grandchildren for Jesus. Uncertainty of our roles; restricted access because of distance; restrictions set by our adult children; aloneness; health and mobility restrictions, and a myriad of other reasons, support the need for camaraderie among grands who are committed to leaving a godly legacy.

The wisdom of God becomes imperative as we relate not only to our Creator but also to one another.  As we listen to grandparents share their hearts, concerns, and great desires for their grandchildren, it becomes apparent that far too many feel alone and discouraged in their journey. Satan would have it so; for in this fight for the spiritual lives of our grandchildren, what better way would there be to stifle the faith of a loving grandparent than through discouragement and isolation? But God in His wisdom instructs us to be united, not fragmented, in our faith and to stand strong against the evil one as the battle rages for the spiritual lives of our children and grandchildren.

In the local church setting, God’s Word tells us to “not neglect to meet together, as is the habit of some, but encouraging one another, and all the more as you see the Day drawing near.” (Hebrews 10:25) The whole idea of meeting together is for “us drawing near with a true heart in full assurance of faith, with our hearts sprinkled clean from an evil conscience and our bodies washed with pure water. Let us hold fast the confession of our hope without wavering, for he who promised is faithful. And let us consider how to stir up one another to love and good works.” And how do we stir up one another? A glance through the one another (allelon) verses gives us plenty of ammunition. Used 93 times in the New Testament, God teaches us how to relate to others: love one another (John 13:34), honour and be devoted to one another (Ro 12:10),  live in harmony (Ro 12:16), build up (Ro 14:19, I Thess 5:11), admonish one another (Ro 15:14, Col 3:16), greet one another (Ro 16:16), care for one another (I Cor 12:25), serve one another (Gal 5:13), bear one another’s burdens (Gal 6:2), forgive one another (Eph 4:2, 32), teach one another (Col 3:16), encourage one another (I Thess 5:11), exhort one another (Heb 3:13) … just to name a few.

By ourselves, it is all too easy to quickly lose sight of the good things the Lord is accomplishing through us as we reach out to our adult children and grandchildren. Just like the lone log from the campfire, our passion, devotion, and dedication to impacting future generations for Christ can be dimmed by the turbulence of life and rob us of the peace of God that brings calmness of soul.  

During the last few weeks, we have all seen the slogan, “We’re in this together.” Are we better together? Yes! Join the movement of Intentional Christian Grandparents who seek to follow Biblical principles as we impact future generations for Christ. At CGNC, we offer a variety of opportunities – Grand Days, Grand Camps, Grandparents at Prayer ([email protected]), Consultations, Resources, Networking, Bible Studies and Seminars tailored to your schedules – to support and fulfill the mission of discipling our grandchildren. Contact us at [email protected] for more information.

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  1. René Blei

    Due to Covid and circumstances I hadn’t seen the grandkids in Calgary for about five weeks, and last Saturday evening decided to pay them a visit. The youngest one, Zackery has cerebral palsy, blind, doesn’t speak or walk and is basically a 14 year old baby. He had suffered the last few weeks of seizures and there times the parents weren’t sure if he would pull through, but, being the fighter he is, he did.
    His Dad lifted him out of his chair and put him in my lap because he loves to interact with others by pulling your hair, ears and nose. After half an hour or so he was put back into his own chair and it was time for me to go home again, when Zachary, out of the blue and in a very clear voice all of us could hear him say,“I love you Opa.”, the first time in 14 years!

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      Kathie Schiedel

      Rene, My eyes are full of tears and my heart is full of praise. Thank you for sharing such a blessed moment. Kathie

Kathie Schiedel

Kathie has been a pastor's wife for over 45 years, mother of three, Oma to seven grandchildren, Bible teacher, and former manager of Our Daily Bread Ministries, Windsor, ON. You will often find her visiting others and offering encouragement in the Lord. Her blogs will speak of seeing God in the everyday occurrences of life and finding Him sufficient through it all.